Guardians of the Financial Galaxy

Macro Man had the, ahem, "pleasure" of taking his youngest, Macro Boy the Younger, to the cinema over the weekend to view the latest comic-book blockbuster, Guardians of the Galaxy.   As he was watching and averting questions about Jackson Pollock, it occurred to him that many of the characters bore more than a passing resemblance to some of the "heroes" of financial policy-making that he's observed over the years.  Call them Guardians of the Financial Galaxy, if you will:

Peter Quill:  He's a bit shifty, a bit of a know-it all, and he's been living in a region of the galaxy that's not where he was born.  Even when he's trying to do the right thing, he can move the goalposts and hoodwink people to get what he wants.   He has a number of unconventional gadgets that help aid him along the way.   He's the star of the show, as he'd no doubt tell you if you asked him.   Who could it be but Mark Carney?   (Apologies to James 'Hollywood' Bullard, but the casting director thought he was a bit out of his depth.)





Gamora:   A woman in a made-dominated world, she kicks ass while cleaning up a lot of other people's messes.  With the guts to be bold when it's required, she's not afraid to leave her natural surroundings to fight for what she believes in.   In  a bit of a surprise, Gamora is represented by Gill Marcus  of the SARB.






Rocket:   A smug know-it-all who isn't quite as clever as he thinks he is, certain aspects of Rocket's physiognomy recall a well-known Wall Street Journal writer who's the frequent recipient of dodgy leaks from the Fed.  However, it would be grossly inappropriate to elevate Mr. Hilsenrath to such a prominent position, so we must focus on Rocket's winning personality.   His hectoring, badgering tone and seeming inability to recognize his own tactical failings will be instantly recognizable to anyone who ever sat though one of Jean-Claude Trichet's  press conferences.




Drax the Destroyer:  In his comfort zone he appears all-powerful  and can intimidate lesser beings to bend to his will.   However, when confronted with larger forces his strength is impotent, and it turns out he isn't actually all that clever; some of his policy choices are actively harmful to the greater good.  His nickname says it all, really, and the fact that the character shares a name with a prominent interest rate futures brokerage is icing on the cake.   Who could it be but Alan Greenspan?




Groot:  This half-creature, half tree is notable for his strength and his inability to say anything but one phrase.   From her wooden performances in press conferences and Congressional testimony to her endless repetition of the "more accommodation needed" mularkey, Janet Yellen is Groot.


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amplitudeinthehouse
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August 12, 2014 at 2:58 PM ×

Thanks for that movie review, perusing the local entertainment guide can prove to be a waste of time , but what I know I'm sure to enjoy it with some pistachio ice cream ,no doubt.
Thanks for that one hey!

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Anonymous
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August 12, 2014 at 6:41 PM ×

Bank of America Merrill Lynch...

"Have you taken out any protection against a sharp fall in equity markets in the next three months?"

http://imgur.com/U2yYyT5

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Polemic
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August 12, 2014 at 10:59 PM ×

A move from minus 60% net to minus 30% of people have bought puts? what does that mean? sounds like a load of double negatives if we aren't careful !

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CV
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August 13, 2014 at 11:21 AM ×

Agree Polemic ... that chart smells to high heavens. What is the put/call ratio these days?

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Polemic
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August 13, 2014 at 12:04 PM ×

Well done MM re Carney - he lived up that role today.

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